July-August 2016 newsletter

Pastoral Letter, July-August 2016A4W

Dear Friends

As I am writing this letter, there is a great deal happening both locally and nationally, but to start with an introduction to the new URC Logo.  For the past six months, the URC’s design team has been working to make the denomination’s visual identity more positive, striking and adaptable.

The Revd John Proctor, URC General Secretary, said: ‘I am delighted with this logo. Our refreshed logo better communicates what we stand for today. The rich symbols of the cross and fish have a new clarity and energy that reflects our call to renewed focus on the fundamentals of our faith.’

I wrote in the last edition about the NW Synod discussions about the future deployment of ministers and the forthcoming Roadshows, where Elders will meet to be part of the discussions.

Our Elders will be meeting with other here at Fulwood on 1st July,

At the May Church Meeting I reported the NW Synod Executive have decided that a short term strategy be put in place with immediate effect. This short term strategy has three elements:

  1. to put on hold all existing vacancies 
  2. not to declare any new vacancies
  3. to consult, via roadshows and meetings with churches and ministers about what the medium term and long term strategies should be.

We have recently received a letter signed by the NW Moderator, Synod Pastoral Committee Convenor and Synod Treasurer with further details.

Nationally, many have been taken by surprise at the outcome of the EU Referendum. On the URC web site, on the day after the result, Revd John Proctor asks “What do churches say and do in immediate response to the decision to leave the EU? Most of us managed to vote. We knew that about half the country would vote the other way. None of us knew which way the result would fall. Now we know – 52:48 for leaving the EU. What do churches say and do at a time like this? Amid divided opinions, we continue to build community, offer friendship and share the love of Jesus. Amid neighbours of many races and cultures, we believe in fellowship that crosses every boundary of frontier and nation. So we value especially the friends whose roots are different from our own. We support our MPs, who now have new tasks to tackle, and surely feel fragile after the death of Jo Cox. They deserve our prayers, and perhaps a word of encouragement, in the work they do for us. We keep up our personal and church contacts in other lands. Britain still needs good relationships with the countries around us, and personal connections are part of that. And we continue to keep our eye open to the needs of the weak, in our own land and in the many poor and troubled countries around God’s world. All of this we do, for Jesus’ sake, in the world he lived in. In difficult times, Jesus spoke, acted and loved with the grace and goodness of God. So may we.“

Further, the United Reformed Church, The Baptist Union of Great Britain, the Methodist Church and the Church of Scotland have jointly offered a reflection and prayer on the result of the EU referendum.

In the midst of change and new challenges we do well to heed John Proctor’s words above, and in our prayers to seek God’s Blessing on the imminent discussions on the future provision of ministry in our Synod, and on all the debates and decisions of our URC General Assembly, taking place in Southport this month.

Mac Dunsmore   Church Secretary

 

Lectionary Readings – July & August 2016Open Bible (100 x 52)

July

3rd     2 Kings 5: 1 – 14; Psalm 30 or Isaiah 66: 10 – 14; Psalm 66: 1 – 9; Galatians 6: (1 – 6), 7 – 16; St Luke 10: 1 – 11, 16 – 20

10th  Amos 7: 7 – 17; Psalm 82 or Deuteronomy 30: 9 – 14; Psalm 25: 1 – 10; Colossians 1: 1 – 14; St Luke 10: 25 – 37

17th  Amos 8: 1 – 12; Psalm 52 or Genesis 18: 1 – 10a; Psalm 15; Colossians 1: 15 – 28; St Luke 10: 38 – 42

24th  Hosea 1: 2 – 10; Psalm 85 or Genesis 18: 20 – 32; Psalm 138; Colossians 2: 6 – 15, (16 – 19); St Luke 11: 1 – 13

31st   Hosea 11: 1 – 11; Psalm 107: 1 – 9, 43 or Ecclesiastes 1: 2, 12 – 14 & 2: 18 – 23; Psalm 49: 1 – 12; Colossians 3: 1 – 11; St Luke 12: 13 – 21

August

7th     Isaiah 1: 1, 10 – 20; Psalm 50: 1 – 8, 22 – 23 or Genesis 15: 1 – 6; Psalm 33: 12 – 22; Hebrews 11: 1 – 3, 8 – 16; St Luke 12: 32 – 40

14th  Isaiah 5: 1 – 7; Psalm 80: 1 – 2, 8 – 19 or Jeremiah 23: 23 – 29; Psalm 82; Hebrews 11: 29 – 12: 2; St Luke 12: 49 – 56

21st   Jeremiah 1: 4 – 10; Psalm 71: 1 – 6 or Isaiah 58: 9b – 14; Psalm 103: 1 – 8; Hebrews 12: 18 – 29; St Luke 13: 10 – 17

28th  Jeremiah 2: 4 – 13; Psalm 81: 1, 10 – 16 or Proverbs 25: 6 – 7; Psalm 112; Hebrews 13: 1 – 8, 15 – 16; St Luke 14: 1, 7 – 14

September

4th     Jeremiah 18: 1 – 11; Psalm 139: 1 – 6, 13 – 18 or Deuteronomy 30: 15 – 20; Psalm 1; Philemon 1 – 21; St Luke 14: 25 – 33

11th  Jeremiah 4: 11 – 12, 22 – 28; Psalm 14 or Exodus 32: 7 – 14; Psalm 51: 1 – 10; 1 Timothy 1: 12 – 17; St Luke 15: 1 – 10

 

Your word is a lamp to guide me and a light for my path

                                                                          Psalm 119: 105

 

A Short Visit to Taunton

The Church magazine is a very good way of keeping us in touch with all members and friends.  At the beginning of June, we drove down to Taunton to spend time with Kath and Duncan.  It didn`t seem 8 months since we last saw them as all of our tongues were well oiled and conversation was easy.

The visit to Taunton was the 1st part of a two week holiday in our motorhome.  Kath and Duncan knew of a caravan park near to their new home and they came to meet us on arriving there after which we had a lovely meal at their new house,

Quantock hillsTheir new house is very homely and the furniture that has moved with them is well placed.  It has really been a new start for them and they are well settled.  Patio doors open onto a private garden which has a water feature.  On our 1st day Duncan drove us to their favourite place – the QUANTOCK HILLS.  Even though we have holidayed in the Minehead area we have never been to the Quantocks and we were very impressed by the whole area especially East Quantock head.

All the Churches in Somerset are open during the day so we naturally inspected some of them.  It was a hot day and we enjoyed sitting out having a picnic lunch.  On the second day we went into Taunton town.  Duncan took Brian to the Somerset County Cricket ground and museum, Kath and I had a walk alongside the river and a browse through the town which is very compact.  That afternoon we visited Andrew and family at Somerton.  Since they left Gateshead they lived in rented accommodation which enabled them to find a new home suitable for the three children and themselves; they moved a quite large detached house in April.  It was lovely to spend time with the family.  Mary will be 5 in January and goes pre-school, John is a very sturdy two and a half year old with set ideas on what he likes and what he does not.  The baby Katy has a lovely smile and is beginning to play with her toys.

Jean & Brian Fazackerley

 

 

A Recommitment to the Common Good

The Joint Public Issues Team of the United Reformed Church, the Baptist Union of Great Britain, the Methodist Church, and the Church of Scotland offers the following reflection and prayer on the result of the EU referendum.

He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?
(Micah 6:8)

This week the people of the UK have made the significant decision to leave the European Union. Across our communities, including in churches, some will face this with dismay; others with celebration. We are already seeing some of the political consequences, including the decision by David Cameron to stand down as Prime Minister later this year.

The pattern of voting has revealed differences within the British people which will be interpreted in various ways. These should not become the tools of division, but spur us to find the common resolve and respect to overcome them. Together we are facing a time of significant change.

Whatever view we might hold about the referendum result, this is a time to recognise that the wellbeing of the UK and its people does not solely depend on its place in the European Union. Fairness and justice for all were never going to be the automatic consequences of being inside or outside a particular institution. They will only become realities if, as a country and as citizens, we intentionally pursue them both at home and abroad.

Our aims for the kind of society we want to live in remain the same. People disagreed whether the kinds of issues we will continue to face – climate change, peace and security, sustainable agriculture, welfare, trade and the movement of people – would be better dealt with by being in or out. We have voted for out. But the aim of pursuing a just society has not changed. After months of sometimes damaging debate we must recommit ourselves to work together for the common good.

Many of the issues we face cannot be effectively addressed in isolation from our near neighbours or indeed worldwide partners. While the structures may change our work towards justice and peace must continue alongside our European sisters and brothers.

We believe that every human being is made in the image of God. Any narrative that undermines this, or promotes division and discrimination, runs contrary to the values of God’s Kingdom. Our prayer is that we might turn away from the language of fear or self-interest and recommit to this sense of our common humanity.

We now face an inevitable process of change, and with that will come uncertainty. As a people of faith, we can draw strength from recognising that God’s purposes prevail beyond any political alliance or union. As God’s Word expresses the intent that every nation shall be blessed, we have a place within the wider world that includes a responsibility towards those who are the most impoverished and needy.

As the implications of this historic decision continue to emerge, we call upon those who lead us to do justice, to love mercy and to walk humbly in the ways of God’s Kingdom.

God of every nation and people,
At this historic moment we pray for all who are affected by the decision that we have made.
Where the narratives of political debate have caused harm and division help us to reclaim the true values of our shared humanity.
Where exaggeration and distortion have generated suspicion and fear may truth and honesty restore hope and goodness.
We pray for all the nations of Europe that you will help us to find ways of living and working together to pursue the mercy and justice that you require.
We recommit ourselves – together – to the values of your eternal Kingdom and pray that along with all people we might help your world become more as you intended.
Amen

 

fulwoodurc.org.uk

Our website Laptophas undergone a few changes recently, one of which relates to the design as we have moved to a new template, another change that we won’t notice is that we have been moved to a new server which should make it more secure (for a while we had a series of stray items appearing on our site but this has now been resolved). 

Our ‘What’s On’ page now displays as a monthly calendar where individual events can be opened for further details but viewers can change this to a list if preferred.  Most of the content of our current newsletter can be viewed on the site as well as archived copies of newsletters since May 2008 when our site was created.  We also have a Church Links page where there is information about the wider URC with links to the National & NW Synod websites, the Central Lancashire Group and links to its churches and Churches Together in Fulwood & Broughton and its churches.  Suggestions of what else could be included on the website will be considered as it will always be a ‘work in progress’.

As one of the first churches to sign up to an iChurch website in 2008, we have received free hosting but churches joining later were charged a small annual support fee. It is now being suggested that iChurch should be run on the same Pay What You Can basis as the Windermere Centre and churches will be invited to give a donation towards the cost of hosting and support for the website.

Margery Pitcher

 

Roving Reporter

Your Roving Reporter’s latest travels took her to a part of England that many people hadn’t heard of – Stretton in the county of Rutland.  It is surrounded by Leicestershire, Lincolnshire & Northamptonshire and contains only two towns, Oakham & Uppingham.  Rutland is the smallest historic County in England and as a county it disappeared in 1974 but was re-instated in 1997.  In such a small county you might think there wouldn’t be much reason for visiting but Rutland Water is a great attraction for many people as there is sailing and fishing on the lake, walking and cycling around the lake and a large nature reserve where ospreys nest (there is a lovely statue of an osprey’s nest on a roundabout at the end of the lake.  The county town of Oakham boasts a Norman ‘castle’ which is actually the great hall of a manor house.  Unfortunately our holiday ended too early to visit the castle as it was undergoing restoration and not due to reopen until 6 days later on Bank Holiday Monday!

However, that didn’t stop our roving as there were quite a lot of English Heritage and National TrustKirby Hall properties within very easy reach so our first day saw us setting off up the A1 to Grantham and Belton House.  The next day we set off in the opposite direction to visit Lyddington Bede house (originally part of a medieval rural palace for the Bishops of Lincoln which became a Bede house, or alms house, in 1600) and the neighbouring church, Lyvedon New Bield (which looks like a ruin but was never completed is decorated with religious symbolism as a testament to sir Thomas Tresham’s catholic faith) and Kirby Hall (a partly ruined Elizabethan country house). 

The weather wasn’t too good on Saturday so we stayed local and went to Oakham and Uppingham.  In Oakham we tried unsuccessfully to find the Methodist church but there was a Congregational Church on the main street where there was a coffee morning and country fair which, of course, we had to visit!  We went back to the church on the Sunday morning when the service was taken by a Methodist Local preacher.  Following the service we went to Barnsdale gardens which for many years were the home to Gardener’s world.  The garden is made up of over 30 plots, most of which were created by Geoff Hamilton in the TV shows.

Normanton ChurchOn Monday we planned to walk part way round Rutland water but we changed our minds when we found out how much it cost to park so we just walked as far as Normanton Church.  Rutland water reservoir was created in the 1970s by demolishing Normanton village and flooding the valley.  The only part of the village to be saved was the church, originally part of the Normanton Hall estate but only the upper half of the building is visible above the water.  When I last visited about 15 years ago, the church contained a display from the local history society and a video of the reservoir’s construction but now it is used as a wedding venue so we couldn’t look round it but it was a lovely spot for looking across the lake.  After that we went to Woolsthorpe Manor, home of Isaac Newton.  In 1665 he returned home from Cambridge University to avoid the plague and 1666 was his ‘Year of Wonders’ when he achieved much of his world-changing science – including the discovery of gravity while sitting under an apple tree in the orchard (a descendant of the original tree can still be seen).  The barn houses a series of experiments where children of all ages can try out how prisms split light, the effects of gravity and centrifugal force among other things.  In the adjoining village we visited Colsterworth Church where Newton was baptised and his parents are buried.

On Tuesday we went to Stamford which Sir Walter Scott described as ‘the finest stone town in England” and has been used as a film set for the 2005 Pride & Prejudice film.  It is a lovely, higgledy-piggledy town with quite a few churches but most of them weren’t open to visitors.  From Stamford we went to the Priest’s House at Easton-on-the-Hill, one of the National Trust’s smallest properties.  The property isn’t staffed so several of the nearby houses hold a key for it, the gentleman we saw was very helpful and also offered a village trail leaflet.  For a small village there were some very grand houses and a large village hall.  Part way round the trail there was a good view over the village, with all the stone-build buildings having local Collyweston slate rooves, it looked like a model village set out before us and it certainly deserves its status as a conservation area.  From Easton, it was back to the cottage to pack ready for our journey home on Wednesday, already wondering where our roving would take us next.

Margery Pitcher

 

Churches Together in Fulwood & BroughtonCTFB logo

The Annual Pilgrimage is to the Lake District and Cartmel Priory Saturday 10th September      

Leave Preston 9:00am
10:30am – Explore Churches in Grange over Sands
12:45 pm – Lunch/ own sandwiches in Bowness
4:00pm – Tour and Service at Cartmel Priory
6:00pm – Evening meal at County Hotel Carnforth
8:30pm – Preston
Cost £25 – early booking would be appreciated. 

 

More volunteers are still urgently needed to staff the Information Desk at the Hospital as, for various reasons, a number of existing volunteers have been lost.  Please consider and pray about the possibility of helping and speak to Vivien, Jean, or Mavis to learn more.

 

Thanks  

Mavis and Derek wish to express their sincere thanks to Church members and friends for the flowers, cards and good wishes received on the occasion of  their Golden wedding.

 

Ministry of Flowers                                                     

                3rd Jul      Mavis Orrell

              10th Jul      Vivien MannersDaisy

              24th Jul      Allison Robb

              7th Aug      Joyce Foster

            14th Aug      Frances Fraser

            21st Aug      Myrtle Smith

              4th Sep      Dorothy Sumner

 

The following real answers to various exams may explain why teachers need long holidays…

What is a nitrate?
Cheaper than a day rate.

What was Sir Walter Raleigh famous for?
He is a noted figure in history because he invented cigarettes and started a craze for bicycles.

What did Mahatma Ghandi and Genghis Khan have in common?
Unusual names.

Name one of the early Romans’ greatest achievements.
Learning to speak Latin.

Name six animals which live specifically in the Arctic.
Two polar bears and four seals.

Name the wife of Orpheus, whom he attempted to save from the underworld
Mrs Orpheus

Where was the American Declaration of Independence signed?
At the bottom.

What happens during puberty to a boy?
He says goodbye to his childhood and enters adultery.   

State three drawbacks of hedgerow removal.
All the cows will escape. The cars drive into the fields. There is nowhere to hide.

What is the meaning of varicose?
Close by

What is a fibula?
A little lie

Why would living close to a mobile phone mast cause ill health?
You might walk into it.

What is a vibration?
There a good vibrations and bad vibrations. Good vibrations were discovered in the 1960s.

Where was Hadrian’s Wall built?
Around Hadrian’s garden

The race of people known as Malays come from which country?
Malaria

Assess Fashion House plc’s choice to locate its factory in Birmingham.
No, People in Birmingham aren’t very fashionable

Thanks to Quantock Coast Benefice Magazine
(and to Duncan & Kath)

 

Prayer

Praying hands 2 (100 x 112)Heavenly Father, we entrust to your loving care the members and friends of our fellowship, both near and far.
Supply their needs, guide their footsteps. keep them safe in body and mind and your peace rest upon our homes and upon those whom we hold dear to us everywhere.
In the name of our Risen Saviour, Lord Jesus Christ.
Amen

 

THE UNITED REFORMED CHURCH VISION STATEMENT

“Called to be God’s people, transformed by the Gospel, making a difference in the world for Christ’s sake”

 

Buying Fairtrade Coffee  Fair trade logo

When you choose Fairtrade coffee, not only can farmers build a better quality of life for their families and communities, they can they can invest in growing better quality beans too.  Fairtrade coffee farmers invest at least 25 percent of their Fairtrade premium in improving productivity and quality.

Choose Fairtrade coffee and you’re also supporting farmers to fight the challenges they may face.  These include the effects of a changing climate, low and unpredictable incomes and in some coffee growing communities, there may not be enough food available for three to four months a year.

Being part of Fairtrade has meant better knowledge about protecting the local environment and the chance to plant other crops and buy livestock to put more food on the table

 

Preston & South Ribble Fairtrade Group

Fairtrade in Nicaragua & Costa Rica
Presentation by John Wareing
Fulwood URC    Tuesday 19th July   7.30 for 7.45pm
Come and hear about the groups that John visited on a recent Traidcraft Meet the People Tour to Central America
Refreshments  Fairtrade Stall   No charge – donations welcome

 

Rotas for July & August 2016

  Welcoming Reading Refreshments
3rd Jul

 

 

Viv Manners

Jean Dunsmore

 

Jean Dunsmore

Brian Fazackerley

 

Jean & Brian

Fazackerley

 

10th Jul

 

 

Norman Croll

Brian Fazackerley

 

James Millar

Craig Millar

 

Mavis Orrell &

Greta Temperley

 

17th Jul

 

 

Jean Dunsmore

Mavis Orrell

 

Greta Temperley

Richard Fraser

 

Norman &

Elizabeth Croll

 

24th Jul

 

 

Frances Fraser

Brian Fazackerley

 

Mac Dunsmore

Viv Manners

Richard &

Frances Fraser

 

31st Jul

 

 

Viv Manners

Norman Croll

 

Brian Fazackerley

Ben Millar

 

Jean & Brian

Fazackerley

 

7th Aug

 

 

Margery Pitcher

Jean Dunsmore

 

Craig Millar

Viv Manners

 

Mavis Orrell &

Greta Temperley

 

14th Aug

 

 

Ben Millar

Brian Fazackerley

 

Mac Dunsmore

Jean Dunsmore

 

Norman &

Elizabeth Croll

 

21st Aug

 

 

Mavis Orrell

Margery Pitcher

 

Craig Millar

Greta Temperley

 

Jean Dunsmore &

Margery Pitcher

 

28th Aug

 

 

Viv Manners

Jean Dunsmore

 

Ben Millar

James Millar

 

Jean & Brian

Fazackerley

 

4th Sep

 

 

Norman Croll

Viv Manners

 

Worship Group

 

Norman &

Elizabeth Croll

 

11th Sep

 

Mavis Orrell

Norman Croll

 

Brian Fazackerley

Viv Manners

 

Mavis Orrell &

Greta Temperley

 

 

Tea, coffee, biscuits etc are supplied by the Church
If you are unable to attend when you are on duty,
please arrange a swap with someone and notify
Mac Dunsmore or Margery Pitcher.

 

 * * * CAN YOU HELP? * * *

Could you help with some of the duties on Sunday mornings?

Our team of people willing to help prepare & serve the refreshments and wash up afterwards is dwindling – please consider if you could help occasionally.  The more people we have on the rota the less often each team would need to be on duty.

Please see Margery if you feel able to help.  Thank you.

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